Soybean Checkoff Research Field Day

Field day attendees learn about the latest in soybean research at the Wye Research and Education Center in Queenstown.

QUEENSTOWN — The Maryland Soybean Board welcomed farmers, industry professionals, researchers, and agency officials on Aug. 11 as it hosted the Soybean Checkoff Research Field Day at the Wye Research and Education Center in Queenstown. Attendees braved the heat to learn about the latest in Maryland soybean research, funded by the soybean checkoff program.

“Research funded by the Maryland Soybean Board helps increase the profitability and sustainability of soybean growers across the state,” said Maryland Chair Belinda Burrier. “The goal of this field day was to share that research with farmers so that it can be applied on their own farms.”

The event featured six different projects being funded by the Maryland Soybean Board:

• Planting Green — Extending the Growing Season to Get More Payback from Cover Crops, Ray Weil, University of Maryland Environmental Science & Technology

• Evaluating Drone for Cover Crop Seeding and Pesticide Applications, Andrew Kness, University of Maryland Extension, Erika Crowl, University of Maryland Extension, Kirk Floyd, K-Drone Services

• Evaluation of Growth-Promoting Products for Soybean Production in Maryland, Andrew Kness, University of Maryland Extension

• University of Maryland Soybean Variety Trials, Nicole Fiorellino, University of Maryland Plant Science & Landscape Architecture

• Evaluating Soybean Variety Performance and Response to Deer Grazing, Luke Macaulay, University of Maryland Extension

• Strategies for Controlling Herbicide Resistant Common Ragweed in Maryland, Kurt Vollmer, University of Maryland Extension

The event wrapped up with a snakehead fish-fry and barbecue dinner. The board plans to continue partnering with University of Maryland to offer similar opportunities for farmers in coming years.

In Maryland, farmers grow about a half a million acres of soybeans, producing more than 20 million bushels of beans each year. With a value of $173 million to the state’s economy, soybeans are one of Maryland’s top crops.

The checkoff program is funded by farmers through an assessment of one-half of one percent of the net market value of their soybeans at the first point of sale. One-half of the checkoff funds stay in Maryland for programs; the other half is sent to the United Soybean Board.

For more information on the Maryland Soybean Board, visit www.mdsoy.com.

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