Lunar eclipse visible in Maryland

“Science visualizer Ernie Wright captured this gem of near-totality from Maryland,” @NASAGoddard tweeted. Early on Nov. 19, “the longest partial lunar eclipse in a millennium, (clocked) in at 3 hours, 28 minutes and 23 seconds,” according to moon.nasa.gov. “There hasn’t been a longer partial lunar eclipse since February 18, 1440, ... and it will remain the longest partial lunar eclipse for 648 years until February 8, 2669. There will be a longer total lunar eclipse on Nov. 8, 2022. “A lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and Moon align so that the Moon passes into Earth’s shadow. In a total lunar eclipse, the entire Moon falls within the darkest part of Earth’s shadow, called the umbra. In this eclipse, up to 99.1% of the Moon’s disk (was) within Earth’s umbra.”

Lunar eclipse visible in Maryland

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