As a resident of Tilghman, I feel compelled to respond to Dorothy Rosenthal’s letter of Tuesday, Oct. 29. She has called out this community and accused it of racism based on her perception of the landscape. She contends that when arriving in Tilghman she didn’t see enough flags at half mast/staff, which she attributes to a lack of respect for Rep. Elijah Cummings, based on racism. There are only two government buildings in Tilghman. The American flag was at half staff at the elementary school, the retainer ring and rope at the post office was not functional. The postmistress had requested that it be fixed so she could hoist the flag.

Most of the businesses have flag holders rather than flag poles, so they cannot lower their flags at half mast. I always fly my flag at half mast not only for government leaders but for our military. It’s obvious Ms. Rosenthal did not canvas every private residence or she would have found other flags at half mast. And to conclude that someone who does not lower his/her flag at half mast is a racist is speculative and without merit.

African Americans work on Tilghman and live on Tilghman, including Anthony Smith, St. Michaels chief of police. Tony is loved by everyone on this island who knows him. Ms. Rosenthal’s comments are patently irresponsible and offensive to the residents of a community which is very patriotic and contributes much to our volunteer fire department, Watermen’s Museum, Philips Wharf Environmental Center and to those in need of all races every single week.

DEANE A. SHURE

Tilghman

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