Seriously, a new Bay Bridge road bridge? Well apart from possibly decreasing congestion at the current bridge without removing vehicles from the road, it will just move the bottleneck further to where it would join up with existing roads and increase bottle necks at 213/50, 404/50, through Easton and through Cambridge. Projected increasing traffic over the next few years will not ease in those bottlenecks. The only sensible and probably cheapest long-term answer is an elevated monorail from O.C. to Salisbury to Kent Island area and across to Annapolis. This could easily go on to New Carrolton and north to Baltimore. This would ease both commuter and holiday traffic. Accessibility and convenience is essential to make public transport a realistic solution. In addition, public transport connections would be needed at all stops and facilities. Ban all nonresident traffic in O.C. and beach towns; buses are already in use in O.C. An elevated monorail would take less land required for roads and infrastructure, less eminent domain of houses and farmland, as well as much less disruption of critical areas. Farming could carry on under the track, and more cars easily added as needed at rush hours and high demand days. A study has been done to relieve congestion on the Frederick to Silver Spring area, which has a lot of information A vehicle bridge would probably be six lanes requiring six lanes each side for a considerable distance. Assuming six lanes plus median, each 435 feet of length of roadway would swallow 1 acre.

DIRK DEKKER

Easton

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